The Narcissistic Conspiracy: Scapegoating, Smear Campaigns And Black Sheep – How Narcissistic Groups Bully Their Targets

When we speak about narcissism, we often focus on the individual. He or she is narcissistic. He or she is a victim of a narcissist. Yet what about those victims who are bullied and targeted by groups filled with narcissistic individuals or in a group where the narcissistic pack leader has toxic enablers? What happens when there is a conspiracy led by an entire group against one individual?

Contrary to popular belief, narcissism can and does run in group dynamics too – it just plays out on an even more massive and destructive scale. Rather than one partner abusing another, there is an entire group working to undermine and plot against a chosen target – whether in the family, the workplace, communities, or friendship circles.

Here’s how it happens and what to know if you’ve ever been persecuted, scapegoated and bullied by a group:

READ: The Narcissistic Conspiracy: Scapegoating, Smear Campaigns And Black Sheep – How Narcissistic Groups Bully Their Chosen Victims


🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

“You must believe that your quest can be successful, even if no one else does. You can deal with setbacks, misadventures, and even disasters as long as you still believe you can overcome the hardships and see your way to the end.” — Chris Guillebeau

Check out more inspirational quotes to brighten your day!

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟

“She’s a pure narcissist, so helping her victims is only about gaining their appreciation and dependence.” — Randy Huggins

Like this quote? Check out more quotes from Criminal Minds.

Advertisements

Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing: The One Thing That Gives Covert Narcissists Away

There is one thing that gives away a covert narcissist – the wolf in sheep’s clothing – even early on. Can you guess what it is?

READ: The Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing: How To Spot A Covert Narcissist And The One Thing That Always Gives Them Away

11 Things I Learned About Narcissists And Sociopaths By Age 27 – That I Wish Everyone Knew

“How can you be so young and know so much about narcissism and psychopathy?” I’ve been met with this question frequently as an author in my twenties who writes about psychological abuse and covert emotional predators. The answer is, on the surface, simple: the child of a narcissistic parent becomes primed to meet more predators in adulthood. We tend to have porous boundaries, a high degree of empathy, resilience and intuition that gets used against us by toxic people. So we often go through a lifetime’s worth of experiences early on that give us hard-won wisdom and insights about toxic people at every point on the spectrum.

I’ve met toxic people across various contexts – from romantic to platonic to professional. From the familial to the foe. From the garden-variety narcissist to the eerie psychopath or sociopath (colloquial terms for those with antisocial traits and a lack of conscience).

I took my findings from childhood and supplemented my real-life experiences with an educational background in psychology and sociology in adulthood. I spent years communicating with and surveying survivors of covert emotional abuse about their experiences.

As a result, I learned not only to identify predators, but to study them, to find ways to counter their manipulative tactics and help other survivors like myself detach and heal.

Here are eleven things I learned about sociopaths, narcissists and toxic people by the age of twenty-seven – that I think everyone should know…

READ HERE: 11 Things I Learned About Narcissists And Sociopaths By Age 27 That I Wish Everyone Knew 

7 Things People Don’t Realize You’re Doing Because You’re The Child Of A Narcissistic Parent

shutterstock_174572168

By Shahida Arabi

Being the child of a narcissistic parent is one of the most heartbreaking and traumatizing things a person can go through. Not only are you required to survive a war zone in childhood, you are left with life-long consequences that extend far into adulthood. Here are seven things you might be doing as a result:

1. Apologizing more than you have to, even if no apology is needed.

Children of narcissistic parents tend to become fluent in saying “sorry” – even for just their very existence. It’s because they’ve been taught by their parents that they are a burden. This is especially true for female victims who are also socialized to be people-pleasing and accommodating. It takes time to unlearn this behavior and learn to only apologize for actual transgressions rather than any perceived burdensomeness.

READ THE REST: 7 Things People Don’t Realize You’re Doing Because You’re The Child Of A Narcissistic Parent